๐Ÿ”ฅ House robbery, e.g.? - Crossword clues & answers - Global Clue

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star 26 Slight 27 Stringed soarers 28 Anagram for Persia 30 Robber killed by 75 Baby carriage 76 Actress Carrere 77 Where drinks are on the house? 89 "โ€‹Three Days of the ": film 91 Decanter 92 So far 93 Milestone, e.g. 94 Iron.


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แ… ARMED ROBBERY, E.G. โ€“ All Answers with 5 letters | Crossword Puzzle Solver
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Cryptic crossword - Wikipedia
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Homeowner Catches Robbers Breaking Into Home On Live Video

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to plunder or rifle (a house, shop, etc.). to deprive of something unjustly or injuriously: The team was robbed of a home run hitter when the umpire called it a foul.


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A cryptic crossword is a crossword puzzle in which each clue is a word puzzle in and of itself. In The Times, for example, all words have at least half the letters checked, and although words can have two Telegraph are published anonymously, so the crossword editor ensures that clues adhere to a consistent house style.


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and major publications. Find clues for house robbery (5 2) or most any crossword answer or clues for crossword answers. BREAK IN. House robbery, e.g.?


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Home burglarized during open house

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and major publications. Find clues for house robbery (5 2) or most any crossword answer or clues for crossword answers. BREAK IN. House robbery, e.g.?


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to a joke (with โ€œitโ€) Flip-flop, e.g. Three sheets to the wind Will Smith film of folk โ€œTahitian Womenโ€ painter Aft Doled out manually Queen Victoria's house trouble Lighten up Inflict on Robbery, for short โ€œBoston Publicโ€ extras 41 75


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House Robber Crossword Clue Answers. Find the latest crossword clues from New York Times Crosswords, LA Times Crosswords and many more.


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star 26 Slight 27 Stringed soarers 28 Anagram for Persia 30 Robber killed by 75 Baby carriage 76 Actress Carrere 77 Where drinks are on the house? 89 "โ€‹Three Days of the ": film 91 Decanter 92 So far 93 Milestone, e.g. 94 Iron.


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Let me guess, you have been playing a crossword game and got stuck on the clue "Give or take, e.g.". Well, you have come to the right place to find the answerโ€‹.


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Shocking Video Shows Burglars Creeping Inside Home As Children Slept Nearby

The latter puzzle, after a long and distinguished run, appeared solely on The Atlantic ' s website for several years, and ended with the October issue. Torquemada's successor at The Observer was Ximenes Derrick Somerset Macnutt , โ€” , and in his influential work, Ximenes on the Art of the Crossword Puzzle , he set out more detailed guidelines for setting fair cryptic clues, now known as "Ximenean principles" and sometimes described by the word "square-dealing". Of these examples, "flower" is an invented meaning using the verb flow and the suffix -er , and cannot be confirmed in a standard dictionary. Here is an example taken from The Guardian crossword of 6 August , set by "Shed". The first newspaper crosswords appeared in the Sunday and Daily Express from about Crosswords were gradually taken up by other newspapers, appearing in the Daily Telegraph from , The Manchester Guardian from and The Times from These newspaper puzzles were almost entirely non-cryptic at first and gradually used more cryptic clues, until the fully cryptic puzzle as known today became widespread. In Chinese something similar is the riddle of Chinese characters, where partial characters instead of substrings are clued and combined. The solver also may need to determine where answers fit into the grid. Torquemada's puzzles were extremely obscure and difficult, and later setters reacted against this tendency by developing a standard for fair clues, ones that can be solved, at least in principle, by deduction, without needing leaps of faith or insights into the setter's thought processes. Easier puzzles often have more relaxed standards, permitting a wider array of clue types, and allowing a little flexibility. The puzzle in The Guardian is well loved for its humour and quirkiness, and quite often includes puzzles with themes, which are extremely rare in The Times. Nearly every clue has two non-overlapping parts to it: one part that provides an unmodified but often indirect definition for the word or phrase, and a second part that includes the wordplay involved. Anagram clues are characterized by an indicator word adjacent to a phrase that has the same number of letters as the answer. Learning these, or being able to spot them, is a useful and necessary part of becoming a skilled cryptic crossword solver. With this example, the words appear in the same order in the clue as they do in the answer, and no special words are needed to indicate this. This kind of clue is called an indirect anagram , which in the vast majority of cryptic crosswords are not used, ever since they were criticised by 'Ximenes' in his book On the Art of the Crossword. In most UK "advanced cryptics" 'variety cryptic' , at least three-quarters of the letters in each word are checked. The definition is "managing money". Other container indicators are "inside", "over", "around", "about", "clutching", "enters", and the like. In these variety puzzles, one or more clues may require modification to fit into the grid, such as dropping or adding a letter, or being anagrammed to fit other, unmodified clues; unclued spaces may spell out a secret message appropriate for the puzzle theme once the puzzle is fully solved. This wordplay gives the solver some instructions on how to get to the answer another way. This is in contrast to non-cryptic crossword clues which often have several possible answers and force the solver to use the crossing letters to distinguish which was intended. The grid shown here breaks one Times grid rule: the letter words at 9 and 24 across each have 8 letters unchecked out of The Independent allows setters to use their own grid designs. Deletions consist of beheadments , curtailments , and internal deletions.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} Torquemada Edward Powys Mathers , who set for The Saturday Westminster from and for The Observer from until his death in , was the first setter to use cryptic clues exclusively and is often credited as the inventor of the cryptic crossword. The challenge is to find the way of reading the clue that leads to the solution. This is usually indicated by words such as "strange", "bizarre", "muddled", "wild", "drunk", or any other term indicating change. The basic principle of fairness was set out by Listener setter Afrit Alistair Ferguson Ritchie in his book Armchair Crosswords , wherein he credits it to the fictional Book of the Crossword :. A typical clue consists of two parts, the definition and the wordplay. In the past this was because hot metal typesetting meant that new grids were expensive. American cryptics are thought of as holding to a more rigid set of construction rules than British ones. A similar trick is played in the old clue "A wicked thing" for CANDLE, where the -ed suffix must be understood in its "equipped with a Sometimes "compiler", or the name or codename of the compiler if visible by the crossword , codes for some form of the pronoun "I, me, my, mine". In Finnish , this type of crossword puzzle is known as piilosana literally "hidden word" , while krypto refers to a crossword puzzle where the letters have been coded as numbers. In essence, a cryptic clue leads to its answer as long as it is read in the right way. In the example above, "about", "unfinished" and "rising" all fall into this category. Most cryptic crosswords provide the number of letters in the answer, or in the case of phrases, a series of numbers to denote the letters in each word: "cryptic crossword" would be clued with " 7,9 " following the clue. Sometimes the two parts are joined with a link word or phrase such as "from", "gives" or "could be". There are many sorts of wordplay, such as anagrams and double definitions, but they all conform to rules. One of the tasks of the solver is to find the boundary between definition and wordplay and insert a mental pause there when reading the clue cryptically. The popular Guardian setter Araucaria John Galbraith Graham , โ€” was a noted non-Ximenean, celebrated for his witty, if occasionally unorthodox, clues. Cryptic crosswords are very popular in Australia. Cryptic crosswords originated in the UK. It usually appears at the start or the end of a clue. Some papers have additional grid rules. It provides two ways of getting to the answer. An anagram is a rearrangement of a certain section of the clue to form the answer. A July "Puzzlecraft" section in Games magazine on cryptic crossword construction noted that for cryptic crosswords to be readily solvable, no fewer than half the letters for every word should be checked by another word for a standard cryptic crossword, while nearly every letter should be checked for a variety cryptic crossword. One example:. The indicator tells the solver that there is an anagram they need to solve to work out the answer. The definition, which usually exactly matches the part of speech , tense , and number of the answer, is in essence the same as any 'straight' crossword clue, a synonym for the answer. In American cryptics, a clue is only allowed to have one subsidiary indication, but in British cryptics the occasional clue may have more than one; e. The first British crossword puzzles appeared around and were purely definitional, but from the mids they began to include cryptic material: not cryptic clues in the modern sense, but anagrams, classical allusions, incomplete quotations, and other references and wordplay. Clues given to the solver are based on various forms of wordplay. Cryptic crossword puzzles come in two main types: the basic cryptic in which each clue answer is entered into the diagram normally, and "themed" or "variety" cryptics, in which some or all of the answers must be altered before entering, usually in accordance with a hidden pattern or rule which must be discovered by the solver. In April , The New Yorker published the first of a new weekly series of cryptic puzzles. The Ximenean principles are adhered to most strictly in the subgenre of "advanced cryptics" โ€” difficult puzzles using barred grids and a large vocabulary. In an American cryptic, only the words given in the clue may be anagrammed; in some older puzzles, the words to be anagrammed may be clued and then anagrammed. Compilers or setters often use slang terms and abbreviations, generally without indication, so familiarity with these is important for the solver. Unlike typical American crosswords , in which every square is almost always checked that is, each square provides a letter for both an across and a down answer , only about half of the squares in a cryptic crossword are checked. In the Daily Telegraph back page, Monday 15 March , 7 down, is "Banish spirits with zero ice upsetting imbibing times 8 "; the answer is EXORCIZE : it means "banish spirits", and is "zero ice" rearranged, including 'x' described as "times". A variation might read Hat turns out to be dry 5 , but this also fails because the word "to", which is necessary to make the sentence grammatical, follows the indicator "turns out" even though it is not part of the anagram indicated. Most of the major national newspapers in the UK carry both cryptic and concise quick crosswords in every issue. Here the composer intends the answer to be "derby", with "hat" the definition, "could be" the anagram indicator, and "be dry" the anagram fodder. The crossword setters do their best to stick to these rules when writing their clues, and solvers can use these rules and conventions to help them solve the clues. In most daily newspaper cryptic crosswords, grid designs are restricted to a set of stock grids. In India the Telugu publication Sakshi carries a "Tenglish" Telugu-English, bilingual cryptic crossword; [11] the Prajavani and Vijaya Karnataka crossword Kannada also employs cryptic wordplay. So in this clue:. Here, the answer is formed by joining individually clued words to make a larger word namely, the answer. In the United States , cryptics are sometimes known as "British-style" crosswords. Cryptic crosswords do not commonly appear in U. However, the order of the parts is sometimes indicated with words such as "against", "after", "on", "with" or "above" in a down clue. It is common for the setter to use a juxtaposition of anagram indicator and anagram that form a common phrase to make the clue appear as much like a 'normal' sentence or phrase as possible. In The Times , for example, all words have at least half the letters checked, and although words can have two unchecked squares in succession, they cannot be the first two or last two letters of a word. Noted cryptic setter Derrick Somerset Macnutt who wrote cryptics under the pseudonym of Ximenes discusses the importance and art of fair cluemanship in his seminal book on cryptic crosswords, Ximenes on the Art of the Crossword , reprinted Because a typical cryptic clue describes its answer in detail and often more than once, the solver can usually have a great deal of confidence in the answer once it has been determined. What the clue appears to say when read normally the surface reading is a distraction and usually has nothing to do with the clue answer. A similar puzzle by the same authors now appears monthly in The Wall Street Journal. Minor exception: simple abbreviations may be used to spice up the process; e. Chew is the anagram indicator; honeydew clues melon , which is to be anagrammed; and fruit is the definition for the answer, LEMON. Compilers of cryptic crosswords are commonly called "setters" in the UK. But "be" is doing double duty, and this means that any attempt to read the clue cryptically in the form "[definition] [anagram indicator] [fodder]" fails: if "be" is part of the anagram indicator, then the fodder is too short, but if it is part of the fodder, there is no anagram indicator; to be a correct clue it would have to be "Hat could be be dry 5 ", which is ungrammatical. There are notable differences between British and North American including Canadian cryptics. More advanced puzzles may drop this portion of the clue. Word boundaries are denoted by thick lines called "bars". Most Australian newspapers will have at least one cryptic crossword, if not two. The other part the subsidiary indication , or wordplay provides an alternative route to the answer this part would be a second definition in the case of double definition clues. For example:. The clues are 'self-checking'. Indicators come either before or after the letters to be anagrammed. There are many "code words" or "indicators" that have a special meaning in the cryptic crossword context. American cryptics usually require all words in a clue to be used in service of the wordplay or definition, whereas British ones allow for more extraneous or supporting words. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}A cryptic crossword is a crossword puzzle in which each clue is a word puzzle in and of itself. In some papers this took until about Puzzles appeared in The Listener from , but this was a weekly magazine rather than a newspaper, and the puzzles were much harder than the newspaper ones, though again they took a while to become entirely cryptic. Some examples are:. In Poland similar crosswords are called " Hetman crosswords".